Get Your FIX: Josh Corn’s "Food Tape"


Beginning with an article of garbage, MFA Products of Design candidate Josh Corn embarked on the process of redesigning a piece of tape in this year's Affirming Artifacts class. Through sketching out 100 concepts, he ultimately imagined a future where chefs would cook with rolls of ingredients that melt down in their pans to produce the intended flavors.

Josh worked to find the benefits this new "food tape" could provide by storyboarding a few use cases: the strips could be used to mitigate food waste while cooking; provide meal alternatives to busy people; or offer an easier form of portion control. 

It was from this point that his first branding effort was created: Fibr—referencing both daily nutrients as well as the form of the actual strips. 

From there he went to the kitchen in order to mockup some prototypes. Blending spices and Tylose powder—usually used for creating gum paste decorations for cakes—the first actual samples of his new product were produced.

Josh continued his exploration by imagining three strategic business partnerships, drafting fictional press releases for the resulting brand collaborations. Here, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation would provide meal strips to lower socioeconomic communities; SpaceX would release their first public-facing product, Mars Meal Ration Strips; and America's Test Kitchen develops a molecular gastronomy recipe book.

 

Leveraging the tape metaphor, the app includes a section showing how the strips could be used to “mend” your meals; if they came out too sweet, too sour, or too salty.

 

Because so much of a designer’s work is looking at the consequences of design, Josh then focused on creating two different app prototypes: one for good and one for evil. His good app is a marketplace for purchasing the Fibr products—along with a place to find and share recipes. Leveraging the tape metaphor, the app includes a section showing how the strips could be used to “mend” your meals; if they came out too sweet, too sour, or too salty.

The evil app, FLVR HCKR, imagines a world where people pirate proprietary flavors from restaurants and share them with the world. Here, the food tape is used to recreate the flavors at home.

After rebranding the flavor strips as FIX, Josh developed a comprehensive marketing campaign, including packaging, billboards, and signage around the country.