Designing from the question, “What bothers you the most?” Tzu-Ching Lin thought to all the infuriating times someone tried to open the door to a public bathroom he was using, often even when the stall was clearly marked as occupied.

If you’ve ever been in a bathroom in a restaurant, you know there’s nothing more disquieting than someone jiggling the doorknob while you’re, um, going.

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“I’ve imagined so many scenarios of how to keep people away from the door knob, and it ended up as, ‘Why don’t I just make the door knob disappear?’” From this came the Invisible Door, a door designed with a retracting knob that sits flush with the door’s surface once it is locked from the inside, making it impossible for someone to even try and open an in-use bathroom stall.

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Tzu-Ching designed the door so that locking it depends on pulling the knob from inside, thus retracting it and turning the door into a “wall”. “The difference between a wall and a door is door knob; no door knob, no disturbance,” says Tzu-Ching.

By making the locking action one and the same with the hiding of the doorknob, Tzu-Ching has guaranteed peace of mind for the person in the bathroom—or any room that uses the Invisible Door.

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