This year, the students of the MFA Products of Design took home 4 honors in this year's Core77 Design Awards! The recognized work spanned multiple categories—from Service Design to Design for Social Impact to Strategy and Research. Check them out below, and click to see the complete projects on Core77!

Designing for Women Veterans: #SheServed Project

Project Team: Alexia Cohen, Jiani Lin, Teng Yu, William Crum, Kevin Cook, Antriksh Nangia

As part of SVA Products of Design's partnership with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (and held through the Design Research and Integration class taught by IDEO's Lawrence Abrahamson), designers Alexia Cohen, Will Crum, Kevin Cook, Jiani Lin, Teng Yu, and Antriksh Nangia explored gender, the military and public perception—creating a design proposal aimed at changing the way people see women veterans. SheServed's ultimate goal is to build public perception of women as a significant and equal part of the US's veteran community, and the project has two main components to help achieve it: an accessible, shareable brand identity and ad campaign, and a program that uses blank postcards to solicit and publish veterans' stories about the exceptional women service-members they know. The next section outlines the details of how the project would work, and how the design team's research and prototyping process led to the proposal in its final form.

[View project on Core77 Design Awards site]

CleanCath Catheter Sterilizer

Designer: Souvik Paul

CleanCath is a catheter sterilizer that was developed in the context of Souvik Paul's MFA thesis Unbound, which explored how different design capabilities could be used to positively intervene in the life of someone who has sustained a spinal cord injury [SCI/D]. The sterilizer uses UV-C radiation to kill bacteria on silicone intermittent catheters, and was developed after Souvik realized that having to relearn urination and defecation was one of the hardest things to adjust to after sustaining an SCI/D because urination and defecation are two of the first things that individuals learn in their development as human beings, before even forming memory. In order to compensate for the fact that the neural network of people with SCI/D has been broken, interrupting their ability to know when they need to urinate or even how to urinate, most individuals with SCI/D are on a urination program, in which they catheterize themselves 4 to 6 times a day.

[View project on Core77 Design Awards site]

Sift

Project Team: Gahee Kang, Doug Fertig, Kohzy Koh (from SVA's MFA in Interaction Design Program)

A common fixture in cities are the "canners" who scavenge through trash for used cans and bottles. Canners are the invisible workers that help ensure that recyclable materials get reclaimed: they return the discarded containers to recycling centers for money. It is not easy, especially for new canners, to identify which containers are of value: less experienced canners waste time and energy collecting containers that are later rejected at the recycling centers. We conceived Sift as a platform that helps canners quickly figure out which containers can be returned for money in their state, while establishing a stronger connection between recycling center and canner. The same platform can be expanded into a system for education purposes: to help educators inculcate an awareness of reclaimable materials in children.

[View project on Core77 Design Awards site]

And winning a second award in the Strategy and Research category, once again:

Designing for Women Veterans: #SheServed Project

Project Team: Alexia Cohen, Jiani Lin, Teng Yu, William Crum, Kevin Cook, Antriksh Nangia

As part of SVA Products of Design's partnership with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (and held through the Design Research and Integration class taught by IDEO's Lawrence Abrahamson), designers Alexia Cohen, Will Crum, Kevin Cook, Jiani Lin, Teng Yu, and Antriksh Nangia explored gender, the military and public perception—creating a design proposal aimed at changing the way people see women veterans. SheServed's ultimate goal is to build public perception of women as a significant and equal part of the US's veteran community, and the project has two main components to help achieve it: an accessible, shareable brand identity and ad campaign, and a program that uses blank postcards to solicit and publish veterans' stories about the exceptional women service-members they know. The next section outlines the details of how the project would work, and how the design team's research and prototyping process led to the proposal in its final form.

[View project on Core77 Design Awards site]